Increasing Reuse Supplies by Blending Nano-Concentrate with Treated Effluent

Authors:

  • Albert Muniz - Hazen and Sawyer
  • D. Albrey Arrington - Loxahatchee River District

Disposal of concentrate from either nano-filtration or reverse osmosis water treatment plants presents a unique challenge. Historically, disposal has been by surface discharge (i.e., ocean outfall) or industrial designed injection well systems. Industrial designed injection well systems require installation of an additional string of casing (tubing) as an added measure of protection to address corrosion issues. In either instance, the net result was loss of a valuable resource.

The Loxahatchee River District (LRD), which was one of the first reuse facilities in the State of Florida, needed additional irrigation quality water to meet ever increasing reuse demands. The LRD reuse program has been so successful, that demands have continued to increase and reclaimed water alone could not meet future demands. Since no additional reclaimed water was available, the LRD began to think outside the box in an effort to expand their reuse system.

The Town of Jupiter, whose water treatment facilities are located adjacent to the LRD water reclamation facility, recently completed construction of a 14.5 mgd nano-filtration water treatment plant. Concentrate produced from the Town’s nano-filtration water treatment plant will produce several million gallons per day. The Town’s disposal options (i.e., surface water discharge) were near capacity and a solution for disposal of concentrate was needed.

LRD staff and Hazen and Sawyer staff worked together and with the Town of Jupiter to develop a concept whereby a blend, consisting of reclaimed water and concentrate, would increase the total quantity of irrigation quality water available for reuse with the added benefit of using an existing municipally designed injection well for backup disposal. The result of this concept was presented to the FDEP, and an acceptable plan was prepared to allow the concept to move forward. Significant cost savings were recognized through this cooperative effort which resulted in the first concentrated blend facility to allow backup disposal via a municipally designed injection well system.

For more information, please contact the author at amuniz@hazenandsawyer.com.

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Horizons Fall 2017 (pdf)

Horizons showcases significant water, wastewater, reuse, and stormwater projects and innovations that help our clients to achieve their goals, and can help you achieve yours. Articles are written by top engineers and process group leaders, demonstrating and explaining the beneficial application of a variety of technologies and tools.

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