New WRF Report Documents Worldwide Stormwater Management Efforts

The Innovative and Integrated Stormwater Management report is now available on the WRF website.

38% of respondent communities use an integrated management approach. Of these, all recognize increased efficiency and co-benefits. 45% of the communities that use an integrated management approach are doing so in response to specific regulatory requirements.

Pollutants or conditions that exceed set thresholds are considered water quality impairments or stressors. Per section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act, states are required to submit lists of waterbodies that do not meet their designated uses and water quality standards. Some waterbodies are required to have numeric limits for pollutants, known as Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). Communities target removal or mitigation of these stressors to meet Total Maximum Daily Loads and meet designated uses.

71% of respondent communities with infrastructure that is sensitive to climate change are implementing programs that mitigate some of the potential impacts. The implementation of resiliency programs is based on a community’s perceived exposure to potential damages associated with climate change, which include temperature, drought, and sea level rise.

100% of respondent communities have customized their public education program to address local conditions such as pollutants, receiving waters, and audience. Communities take a tailored approach to developing their public education programs to ensure local effectiveness.

100% of respondent communities implement an illicit discharge detection and elimination program, 64% of which are a consistent community-wide program and 36% implement a watershed-focused program.

(NEW YORK, NY – October 25, 2017) – Hazen recently completed the Innovative and Integrated Stormwater Management report for New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), published in partnership with the Water Research Foundation as part of its focus on One Water.

The report compiles data from 34 communities/utilities, jointly interviewed by Hazen and DEP, about their stormwater/MS4-related programs and the synergies with water and wastewater programs. The purpose of the report is to provide an enhanced understanding of what strategies utilities/communities are implementing and refine New York City’s approach to a stormwater program that is both integrated and innovative while meeting regulatory requirements.

Among the findings, we discovered:

  • 38% of respondent communities use an integrated management approach, and all of them realized benefits and efficiency improvements.
  • 100% of respondent communities within the United States have some stream segments that are impaired and do not meet their designated uses.
  • 59% of respondent communities are required to meet numeric requirements for waterbody impairments, while 3% of the communities implement programs on a voluntary basis.
  • 71% of respondent communities with infrastructure that is sensitive to climate change are implementing programs that mitigate some of the potential impacts.
  • 100% of respondent communities have customized their public education program to address local conditions.
  • 64% of respondent communities have a consistent community-wide IDDE program and 36% implement a watershed-focused program.

The report topics encompass stormwater control measures recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as well as topics that are critical to stormwater program success or can result in progressive and innovative water quality solutions. By sharing the Innovative and Integrated Stormwater Management report, the partners hope that other service providers can use it to cost-effectively improve the health of local water bodies and deliver related benefits to their communities.

A copy of the report can be requested on the WRF website.

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